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The Woman Behind Little Women  
    
 
 
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Interested in discussing Lousia May Alcott? Sign up to participate in our book discussions!

Sandusky Library is hosting a series of book discussions, including a Mother/Daughter group. The schedule is below:

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT: THE WOMAN BEHIND LITTLE WOMEN - BOOK DISCUSSION
Wednesday, October 26th, 6:00 p.m. - Library Program Room

A vivid, energetic account of the life of the beloved author, Louisa May Alcott portrays a writer as worthy of interest in her own right as her character, Jo March. Author Harriet Reisen addresses all aspects of Alcott’s life: the effect of her father’s self-indulgent Utopian schemes, her family’s economic difficulties and frequent moves, her experiences as a Civil War nurse, and the loss of her health and her recourse to opiates to relieve the pain.

 

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT MOTHER-DAUGHTER BOOK CLUB - BOOK DISCUSSION
Saturday, November 12th, 2:00-3:30 p.m. - Library Program Room

This book discussion program is for girls ages 11-14 and their mothers, grandmothers, or other caregivers. Join us as we discuss the book The Mother-Daughter Book Club by Heather Vogel Fredrick. The book is set in Louisa May Alcott’s hometown of Concord, Massachusetts and tells the story of four middle school-age girls that must read the book Little Women at a book discussion group organized by their mothers. Stop by the Reader’s Advisory Desk beginning October 24 to register and pick up a copy of the book. It is not necessary to read the book to attend the discussion.

 

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT WROTE THAT? THRILLERS AND CIVIL WAR SKETCHES
Wednesday, November 16th, 6:00 p.m. - Library Program Room

Alcott is best known for her children’s novel Little Women, but she authored many books for adults. At this program, Sandy Zagarell will explore My Contraband, the first sketch from Hospital Sketches and other short fiction about the Civil War. She will also lead the discussion of Alcott’s literary thriller Behind a Mask.

 

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT: LITERARY PHENOMENON AND SOCIAL REFORMER
Saturday, December 3rd, 2:00 p.m. - at the Follett House Museum

This discussion will focus on Alcott’s success at making a living as a writer and how she used her writing to advance some of her era’s ideas for social reform, including Abolitionism and women’s rights. Participants will read and discuss Transcendental Wild Oats, a satire on her family’s life in a 19th Century Utopian community and Work: A Story of Experience, a novel about women’s rights and responsibilities beyond the family.

 

GOOD GIRLS, MEAN GIRLS, VAMPIRES, AND LITTLE WOMEN: LITTLE WOMEN AS POPULAR CULTURE
Saturday, January 14th, 2:00 p.m. - Library Program Room

Join us as we discuss the classic novel Little Women and talk about its place in contemporary culture. We will show clips of the movie Mean Girls and Little Women. This program will wrap up the series.